wng yu 30 translations

 

di zōng r h? hɑ d L L L L

q qīng wi liǎo. leǔ L r L d r

zo hu zhōng shn xi, siòu r d L L d

yīn yng hūn xiǎo xěu L L e L r

dng xiōng shēng cng yn, hiuən r L L L L

ju z r guī niǎo. děu e r e L r

hu dāng lng ju dǐng, děng d L L L r

lǎn zhng shān xiǎo! siɛ̌u e r d L r

 

Rhyme: ABCBDBEB (see Stimson, Hugh M. T'ang Poetic Vocabulary (New Haven: Far Eastern Publications, Yale University, 1976), p. ix)

 

[泰山不可丈尺

Taishan buke zhang chi

On ne mesure pas le mont Taishan avec une rgle

Taishan cannot be measured with a ruler

<daodejing.free.fr/bib/10%20Tian%20yi%20-%2005%202005.pdf>]

 

 

Hawkes, David A Little Primer of Tu Fu (Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1967) (literal)

Gaze Mountain

 

Daizong then like-what

Qi Lu green never ends

Creator concentrated divine beauty

Northside southside cleave dark dawn

Heaving breast are-born layered clouds

Bursting eye-sockets enter returning birds

Really-must surmount extreme summit

Single-glance many-mountains little

 

 

Yip, Wai-lim, ed. Chinese Poetry: Major Modes and Genres (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1976) (literal)

Looking at Mount Tai-shan

 

Tai Tsung (part.) how -

Chi Lu green not-yet over

Creation - concentrate miraculous beauty

Yin Yang cut dusk dawn

turbulent breast grow layered cloud/s

force eyelid enter return bird/s

expect should exceed extreme summit

one glance various mountains small

 

 

Alley, Rewi Tu Fu: Selected Poems (Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1964)

Looking at Taishan

 

Why has Taishan become so sacred?

See how over Qi and Lu it stands

Never losing its light blue majesty!

Endowed in the beginnings with such

Spirit; its sunny face and then its dark slopes giving

Dawn and dusk in one moment; clouds rising

In tiers ever refreshing it; not easy

To follow the birds as they fly

Back up its heights; one day I shall climb

Clear to the summit,

Seeing how small surrounding

Mountain tops appear as they lie below me.

 

 

Ayscough, Florence Tu Fu: The Autobiography of a Chinese Poet, A.D. 712-770 (2 Volumes) (London: Cape, 1929, 1934)

Gazing from Afar to the Lofty Mountain

 

What then is the nature of Tai Tsung, Honourable Ancestor of all Mountains?

Seen from Chi in North, from Chu in South, its green colour does not fade away.

Invested at hour of formation and evolution with supernatural qualities,

Dividing northern shade from southern light, it cuts the darkness from the dawn.

Into cloud layers, rising from its scoured breast,

Fly birds returning to roost; my eyes open until the corners crack follow their flight.

I shall climb Nothing Beyond Peak,

Whence beheld, all hills are small.

 

 

Baird, Nathan (ensie.blogspot.com/2006_04_01_archive.html)

Gazing at Mount Tai
 
This God-mountain Daizong is like what then?
In all this place its green has no end.
Here, Creator focused divine beauty.
Its yin-yang slopes cleave dark from dawn Ascend,
and heaving, climbing lungs bear layered clouds,
Eyes burst entering returning birds-- Friend,
One day Ill stand atop its highest peak
In one glance any other mountain small!

 

 

Barnstone, Tony & Chou Ping (www.thedrunkenboat.com/dufu.html)

Looking at Mount Tai

 

How is Mountain Tai?
Its green is seen beyond State Qi and State Lu,
a distillation of creation's spirit and beauty.
Its slopes split day into Yin and Yang.
Its rising clouds billow in my chest.
Homecoming birds fly through my wide-open eyes.
I should climb to the summit
and in one glance see all other mountains dwarfed.

 

 

Bonta, Dave (www.vianegativa.us/2004/03/26/mysterious-mountains)

Gazing at Tai Shan

 

This mountain of mountains how / to put it in words?
Throughout Qi and Lu, a blue / that never fades. The Maker fills it
with power, unearthly beauty.
North face, south face divide / the dark from the dawn.

Heaving lungs / give birth to layered clouds,
straining eyes join the birds / returning to the peak.
Someday I swear Ill climb / clear to the summit,
watch all other mountains / shrink into / a single / glance!

 

 

Bromberg, Sam (www.wheretherebedragons.com/participants/highlights.asp?HTID=30&AID=3037)

Look at the Mountain

 

What does the mountain look like?

The mountain is green and huge.

Nature puts it all together magically and beautifully.

Opposite sides of the mountain; cut the dawn and dusk.

The mountain is very high and surrounded by many large clouds.

Many birds return to this mountain.

When you climb to the highest point, you are now the highest point.

Look around, all the other mountains seem small.

 

 

Brownrigg, Ray (www.mcs.vuw.ac.nz/~ray/ChineseEssays)

Gazing Upon the Sacred Mount

 

So what about Taishan?

From all around eer blue.

Creation of the Lord,

It splits the day in two.

Clouds ease a troubled mind,

Far birds a strain to view.

Each must one day ascend,

Look down on all, to do!

 

 

Bynner, Witter The Jade Mountain: A Chinese Anthology (New York: Knopf, 1931)

A View of Tai-Shan

 

What shall I say of the Great Peak?
The ancient dukedoms are everywhere green,
Inspired and stirred by the breath of creation,
With the Twin Forces balancing day and night.
...I bare my breast toward opening clouds,
I strain my sight after birds flying home.
When shall I reach the top and hold
All mountains in a single glance?

 

 

Chung Yoon Ngan (www.asiawind.com/forums/read.php?f=2&i=6138&t=6138)

Visiting a High Mountain

 

How do you explain the high and steep of this mountain called Taishan?

Originally, the two States of Qi and Lu were being endlessly joined together by Taishan.

It was because heaven and earth created everything.

The air of everything created in the world was condensed in this high mountain.

The front of the mountain received sunlight most of the time but the back of it received no sunlight. Due to this reason the mountain was divided into two environments of one side being bright and the other dark.

The thing that really able to stir my heart was the layer of clouds on top of the mountain.

By looking carefully one could see the birds returning to their nests.

If I ever had the opportunity I would climb to the top of the mountain to see how small were other mountains in comparison to Taishan.

 

 

Dongbo (www.mountainsongs.net/poem_.php?id=202)

Viewing Mt. Tai

 

How about old Mt. Tai?

Holding apart Qi and Lu.

Natures bounty elegant,

Slicing YinYang

begetting day and night.

Rocking my bosom

spawning thunderheads,

Scowling

at returning birds.

Approaching the summit

One glance below

Only puny hills!

 

 

Fletcher, W. J. B. Gems of Chinese Verse (Shanghai: Commercial Press Ltd., 1919)

T'ai Shan

 

Of T'ai Shan what can one say?

Here Lu and Ch'i for aye

Freshly their youth retain.

Here Heaven and Earth unite

Spiritual grace to form:

As a pole of shade and light

It sunders the dusk and dawn.

Soaring through layers of cloud,

At sight of it swells the breast.

At a glance the eye can view

The birds coming home to rest.

But climb to the uttermost peak-

All other hills seem small

As the eye o'erlooks them all !

 

 

Hart, Henry H. The Charcoal Burner, and Other Poems; Original Translations from the Poetry of the Chinese (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1974)

Tai Shan

 

What shall I say of Tai Shan?

Here the states of Chi and Lu

Survive and flourish.

Here all unite to create and nourish

A grace and spirit.

Here Yang and Yin appear at dusk and dawn.

Looking to the heights

That soar far above the clouds

Makes ones breast swell in wonderment.

From it one sees the flight of birds

That come and go,

And when one ascends the topmost peak of all,

The other mountains in the land

Seem small indeed.

 

 

Hawkes, David A Little Primer of Tu Fu (Oxford : Clarendon Press, 1967)

On a Prospect of Mount Tai

 

How is one to describe this king of mountains? Throughout the whole of Ch'i and Lu one never loses sight of its greenness. In it the Creator has concentrated all that is numinous and beautiful. Its northern and southern slopes divide the dawn from the dark. The layered clouds begin at the climber's heaving chest, and homing birds fly suddenly within range of his straining eyes. One day I must stand on top of its highest peak and at a single glance see all the other mountains grown tiny beneath me.

 

 

He Yefei (www.cs.uiowa.edu/~yefeihe/poetry/tu_fu_poems.html)

Gazing at the Great Mount

 

To what shall I compare
The Sacred Mount that stands,
A balk of green that hath no end,
Betwixt two lands!
Nature did fuse and blend
All mystic beauty there,
Where Dark and Light
Do dusk and dawn unite.
Gazing, soul-cleansed, at Thee
From clouds upsprung, one may
Mark with wide eyes the homing flight
Of birds. Some day
Must I thy topmost height
Mount, at one glance to see
Hills numberless
Dwindle to nothingness.

 

 

Hinton, David The Selected Poems of Tu Fu (London: Anvil Press Poetry, 1990)

Gazing at the Sacred Peak

 

For all this, what is the mountain god like?
An unending green of lands north and south:
From ethereal beauty Creation distills
There, yin and yang split dusk and dawn.
Swelling clouds sweep by. Returning birds
Ruin my eyes vanishing. One day soon,
At the summit, the other mountains will be
Small enough to hold, all in a single glance.

 

 

Hsieh, Daniel Du Fu's "Gazing at the Mountain" Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews (CLEAR), 16, (1994): 1-18 JSTOR 28 Aug. 2007 <links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0161-9705(199412)16%3C1%3ADF%22ATM%3E2.0.CO%3B2-N>

Gazing at the Mountain

 

Mount Tai-What is it like?

Through Qi and Lu its azure never ends;

Here the Creator gathers wonders divine,

Its northern and southern slopes divide dusk and dawn.

Heaving breast-growing layered clouds,

Split eye-sockets-enter returning birds;

One day I (too) will mount the highest peak,

Where in one glance all other mountains dwindle.

 

 

Hung, William Tu Fu: Chinas Greatest Poet (New York: Harvard University Press, 1952)

Gazing up the Tai Mountain

 

How becomes the Tai a worshipful mountain?

See how the greenness of the surrounding plains is never lost.

Creation has lavished there its mysterious wonders;

The sunny and shady sides fashion dawn and dusk at the same moment.

The growing layers of clouds might scour ones bosom of worldly thoughts;

To follow those returning birds would strain my eyes.

One day I shall climb like Confucius to the top

To see how the surrounding hills dwarf into moles.

 

 

Jenyns, Soame A Further Selection from the Three Hundred Poems of the Tang Dynasty (London: J. Murray, 1944)

Gazing at a View of Tai Shan

 

Tai Shan, what shall I say about you?

To the front of you Chi, behind you Lu

Green as far as the eye can see;

Heaven and earth unite in you their spiritual grace.

(Around your peaks) the Yin and Yang divide dusk from dawn.

Your piled up clouds purge my feelings,

My straining eye can (scarcely) follow yur birds into their nests.

If I climb the mountain to its summits

Hills stretch away beneath me on every side.

 

 

Kotewall, Robert & Normal L. Smith in Davis, A. R., ed. The Penguin Book of Chinese Verse (Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1962)

A View of Taishan

 

What shall I say of the Great Peak? --

The ancient dukedoms are everywhere green,

Inspired and stirred by the breath of creation,

With the Twin Forces balancing day and night.

...I bare my breast toward opening clouds,

I strain my sight after birds flying home.

When shall I reach the top and hold

All mountains in a single glance?

 

 

Lunde, David (www.chinapage.com/poet-e/dufu2e.html)

Gazing at Mount Tai

 

How to describe Tai mountain?
Its green towers above all of Chi and Lu!
Here the Creator concentrated divine beauty;
its north and south sides split dark from dawn.
Chest pounding, you reach the birthplace of clouds;
bursting eyes fill with birds returning to nest.
Someday I must climb to the very top,
look down on all of the little mountains at once.

 

 

McCraw, David R. Du Fu's Laments from the South (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1992)

Gazing at the Marchmount

 

Successor Alp now what is it like?

Over Qi and Lu greening interminate.

The Creator of Changes converged divine glory;

Sun- and shadow slopes cleave dusk from dawn.

Heaving the breast, to arouse layered clouds;

Popping the pupils, to send in homing birds.

My time will come to surmount its pinnacle

And, in one view, survey all alps so wee.

 

 

Murphy, James R. (www.torusflex.com/poetry%20project1/poetry.html)

Gazing up the Tai Mountain

 

i ask myself why should i worship tai mountain

and i note how green flourishes everywhere below

the life force itself is up there manifest

yin, yang, light, dark, all there at once

the breathing clouds take breath away

eyes squint to see the birds fly back to their nests

and i like confucius will climb to the top

to gaze back down on the smallness below

 

 

orchid_dreams (www.chinahistoryforum.com/lofiversion/index.php/t14104.html)

View of Mt. Tai


What shall I say of the Great Peak?
The ancient dukedoms are everywhere green
Inspired and stirred by the breath of creation
With the Twin Forces balancing day and night
My chest holds layers of clouds
I strain my sight to see the birds flying home
Once I get to the very top
All the other mountains will look very small

 

 

Owen, Stephen The Great Age of Chinese Poetry: The High Tang (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1981)

Gazing on the Great Peak

 

And what is Tai Mountain like?

Over ChI and Lu a green unceasing.

Here Creation concentrated unearthly glory,

Dark north slope. The sunlit south divide dusk and dawn.

Sweeping past breast growing layered cloud,

Eyes pupils split, moving in with homing birds.

The time will come when I pass up to its very summit,

And see in one encompassing vision how tiny all other mountains are.

 

 

Wang Yushu Selected Poems and Pictures of the Tang Dynasty (China Intercontinental Press, 2005)

Looking at Mountain Tai

 

What shall I say about the Mountain Tai?

Further than Qi and Lu its green tracts lie.

The Creator clothes it in divine array;

While its north side shows night, its south side shows day.

With its layers of clouds, open hearts rise;

Home-bound birds can be seen with ones strained eyes.

I wish I could climb to its summit someday

And have of smaller mounts a broad survey.

 

 

Yip, Wai-lim, ed. Chinese Poetry: Major Modes and Genres (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1976)

Looking at Mount T'ai-shan

 

How about the Mount of Mounts?

From ChI to Lu, never ending green.

Great Transformation centers here divine beauty.

Shade and light divides here dusk and dawn.

Rolling chest: in it are born layers of clouds.

Eyelids strained to open by incoming birds from afar.

Ah! To stand atop the highest peak

To see: how tiny the rest of the hills!

 

 

unknown (dictionary.jongo.com/experience/detail/386.html)

Gazing At Mount Tai

 

O, peak of peaks, how high it stands!

One boundless green o'erspreads two states.

A marvel done by nature's hands,

O'er light and shade it dominates.

Clouds rise therefrom and lave my breast;

I strain my eyes and see birds fleet.

I must ascend the mountain's crest;

It dwarfs all peaks under my feet.

 

 

unknown (sl.iciba.com/viewthread,40,241168,1.shtml)

Gazing on Mount Tai

 

Peak of peaks, how high it stands!

One boundless green o'erspreads two states.

A marvel done by Nature's hands,

O'er light and shade it dominates.

Clouds rise therefrom and lave my breast.

My eyes are strained to see birds fleet.

Try to ascend the mountain's crest,

It dwarfs all peaks under our feet.